Although mushrooms grow during the summer, spring and autumn are the ideal season for harvesting mushrooms–those fun little fungi that have marvelous healing benefits for the body. It seems that no one knows for sure how many varieties of mushrooms exist in nature.  Upwards of 10,000 varieties grow in North America alone, and it’s estimated that more that 60-75% of those are edible.  Whatever the real number, mushrooms exist in abundance, and they dry quickly and well for storage, making them a food that should be a staple in the diet.

Likely they have saved many a family during the harsh months of winter, when dried mushrooms could be added the stew pot to make a simple, nourishing meal.  Nearly every ancient culture, like the Chinese, have treasured mushrooms for longevity, strength and for treating a number of illnesses. 
I make this hot pot with seasonally foraged mushrooms. No, I’m not a forager myself, I go hunting through the local farmer’s market and coop and support another’s livelihood.  In the spring, when morels are about, I make this with a lighter broth like chicken. When the cooler weather starts to creep into fall, then a slightly richer broth, maybe a mix of beef, chicken and mushroom appear.
I make most of my broth stock from scratch, which, beside bones includes a chunk of kombu, leeks and some mushrooms–however, purchased broth works fine if you have neither the time or means.

 

Mushroom Hot Pot (Kinoko Nabe)
Print Recipe
A delightfully warm meal to enjoy with the family
Servings Prep Time
4 serving 20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 serving 20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Mushroom Hot Pot (Kinoko Nabe)
Print Recipe
A delightfully warm meal to enjoy with the family
Servings Prep Time
4 serving 20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 serving 20 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: serving
Instructions
Prepare the broth
  1. If you choose to use the bonito flakes--In medium stock pot, add in bonito flakes and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain out bonito flakes. I use a fine mesh strainer or large tea ball so I don't have to strain the whole pot. I'm cheating here and making a quick dashi. Remove from heat.
Start building the hot pot
  1. In hot pot or stock pot add chicken, cabbage and tofu. Ladle in broth. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.
Layer in other ingredients
  1. Uncover pot and begin layering in mushrooms. Cover and simmer for another 5 minutes. We want a low, slow simmer that doesn't boil the ingredients apart. Uncover and add in spinach or kale and sprouts, cover and simmer for 2-3 minutes or just until spinach is bright. Garnish with a dash of cayenne unless you can find shichimi --a Japanese pepper. Enjoy at the table with friends
Recipe Notes

Healing energetics: Treasured in many cultures for their healing and longevity properties, mushrooms are loaded with polysaccharides, which is effective in helping to fight cancers by strongly rallying the immune system. They build the Wei Qi, fight pathogens and many mushrooms also contain cytotoxic, antibacterial, antioxidant and antiviral properties.

All mushrooms are deeply nourishing and tonify Yin, Blood, Qi and Fluids. They warm the core and benefit the Spleen, Lungs and Kidneys. The broth in this recipe is additionally deeply nourishing, the sprouts provide protein.

Primary season: Spring, Autumn, Winter

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